Newsletter – May 2022

Would you like to receive this newsletter in your email inbox? Sign up for a free AAG account now and select AAG Newsletter under your communication preferences.


PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

Do Look Up

By Emily Yeh

The 2020 Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado, the largest wildfire in the state’s history. Credit: Phil Millette, National Interagency Fire Center

In a recent review of Don’t Look Up, the terrifyingly close-to-home satire of collective inaction on global warming, Pablo Ortiz of the Union of Concerned Scientists suggests that one form of “looking up” is to write and share about how climate change is affecting you, as a means of building a larger movement… taking Ortiz’s advice, I begin here by briefly describing one way climate change is affecting the place I live.


ANNUAL MEETING

AAG 2023 Denver Postcard - Bird's eye view of Denver, Colorado, 1908 vintage mapSave the Date for AAG 2023 in Denver

Join us for the Mile-High meeting. Mark your calendar for the hybrid AAG Annual Meeting in Denver, CO on March 23-27, 2023. We invite you to organize and participate in sessions, workshops, field trips, special events, and activities. Look for more information throughout the summer to help you plan. We look forward to seeing you online and in the Rocky Mountains.


PUBLICATIONS

NEW Annals of the American Association of Geographers Issue Alert: The 2022 Special Issue of the Annals on Displacements

Annals journal coverThe Annals publishes a special issue each year to highlight research around a specific theme of global importance. The contains 26 articles on the topic of Displacements and is guest edited by Kendra Strauss. The articles are divided into five sections: Theorizing Displacements; Understanding Experiences of Displacement: Concepts, Methodologies, and Data; Urbanization and Infrastructures; Bringing in the State; and Politics and Praxis. The 2022 Special Issue on “Displacements” explores how, building on our history of critical engagement with place, geographers from across the discipline can contribute empirical, theoretical, and methodological insights on displacements and their implications. Contributions addressing displacements through multi- and -inter-disciplinary engagements with geographical theory and methods are from a broad range of perspectives, locations, and historical and contemporary contexts.

All AAG members have full online access to all issues of the Annals through the Journals section of the . Read more about the Annals Special Issue .

Questions about the Annals? Contact .

NEW The Professional Geographer Issue Alert: Articles with topics ranging from pedestrian access to K-12 schools to Finnish sauna diplomacy

The Professional Geographer Cover FlatThe latest issue of The Professional Geographer is now available () with 10 new research articles plus a six article focus on . Article topics include ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and . Study areas include ; ; and . Authors are from a variety of global institutions including: ; ; ; and .

All AAG members have full online access to all issues of The Professional Geographer through their member dashboard. Each issue, the editors choose one article to make freely available. In this issue you can read by Matthew R. Lehnerta and Seth Alan Williams for free.

Questions about The Professional Geographer? Contact .

NEW Issue of The AAG Review of Books Published

Review-of-Books-Cover

The latest issue of The AAG Review of Books is now available () with 7 book reviews on recent books related to geography, public policy and international affairs. The new issue also includes a film review of the documentary Holding Tightly: Custom and Healing in Timor-Leste and two book review fora. 2022 marks the ten-year anniversary of The AAG Review of Books and this issue includes from current editor Debbie Hopkins.

Questions about The AAG Review of Books? Contact .

In addition to the most recently published journal, read the latest issue of the other AAG journals online:

• Annals of the American Association of Geographers
• The Professional Geographer
• GeoHumanities
• The AAG Review of Books


ASSOCIATION NEWS

Support the AAG Student Travel Fund — Make a Difference in the Life of a Young Geographer

One of AAG’s top fund-raising priorities for 2022 will be the AAG Student Travel Fund. We will launch this fund-raising effort in the coming days via email.

As we all realize, nothing can take the place of the meeting experience. It’s so valuable to presenting your research, networking, and connecting with colleagues. With the pandemic behind us, and the annual meeting now transformed into a hybrid (in-person with some virtual presenters) and virtual experience, we need to support our students. They have patiently waited to return to the new normal and now are faced with rising travel costs and diminished conference budgets that may make attending the 2023 AAG Annual Meeting challenging.

Our goal is to support at least 100 students and to offer enrichment awards of up to $500 to support their travel and/or participation as a hybrid or virtual attendee. .

Have Your Department or Program Featured in Recruitment Video

A World of Possibilities video still showing an illustration of a map of North America with network lines hovering overLast fall, AAG worked with Green Jay Strategies to produce the “” video, designed to be used to recruit students into geography programs. Many programs took advantage of our offer to customize the video with your logo and contact information, so we are extending that offer again this year. To see an example of how your information will be featured in the video, .

Getting your customized copy is especially valuable this year, as AAG’s 2022 Geography Awareness Week theme will be tied to the video. If you would like to get a version featuring information for your program, please send an email to and include your approved logo, department/program name, contact person, contact website, contact email, and contact phone number. Please also include the email address where you would like the final video sent.

Please submit all requests by May 20. The final video will be emailed back to you in early June.

The video is aimed at students who are early in their process of discovering a geography degree and considers the research of Dr. Justin Stoler (University of Miami) on the understanding and preferences of undergraduate students. We would like to again thank AAG members Dr. Debarchana Ghosh, Dr. Deborah Thomas, Dr. Jacqueline Housel, Dr. Jason Post, Dr. Justin Stoler, and Dr. Wan Yu for their roles in helping shape this video and the AAG COVID-19 Response subcommittee for proposing this project.

Spots Available in AAG’s New Expanded Professional Development Webinar Series

Photo of African American woman participating in an online program on her laptop while taking notesHave you signed up for one of our Professional Development Webinar Series yet? Whether you’re a student, recent graduate, job seeker, department head, or a career geography professional, AAG has an event that is right for you.

Our coming webinars include:

. Hear from geographers who have successfully utilized their degrees to launch careers in these sought-after fields.

. Explore ways geographers are influencing policy and aiding social movements.

. Hear from geographers carving out career paths with a focal point outside of GIS or GIS-related experience.

!

Registration Open for Summer Series for Grad Students and Recent Graduates

Photo of African American student writing notes in notebook with book and laptop at a cafe tableThe AAG 2022 Virtual Summer Series is back. Sign-ups are open for our Graduate Forums and Seminars, which will continue throughout the summer.

Our are led by the AAG Graduate Student Affinity Group and will offer graduate students with sessions that enable them to network and feel a sense of community.

Our target Master’s or Doctoral students in Geography programs and recently graduated geographers, and cover a wide range of practical topics.

Take Part in the AAG’s Graduate Faculty Development Alliance Workshops, June 13-17

Participants of the 2008 GFDA workshop gather for a photoTwo summer professional development workshops from the AAG’s Graduate Faculty Development Alliance will continue online in 2022. Registration will be filled on a first come, first served basis and is free for AAG Members and $150 for non-members.

Department Chairs, Heads, new Deans, and other emerging leaders — develop the tools you need to do your job, network with peers, and learn from top leadership professionals in an inclusive, innovative, and interactive series.

The AAG Geography Faculty Development Alliance for early career geographers, as well as non-AAG members who are graduate students or teaching geography in higher education, offers an innovative, new online approach to the highly successful early career workshops that have been offered since 2002.

.


Member News

May Member Updates

Dr. Andrew Sluyter, Professor of Geography at Louisiana State University, has received a highly prestigious . The foundation awarded 28 fellowships from 300 extraordinary scholars nominated by the leaders of select universities and other preeminent institutions. Each fellow receives $200,000 over two years to support visionary scholarship on important and enduring issues confronting our society.

Two geographers have been named to the 2022 class of Guggenheim Fellows. Karen Bakker, a Professor in the Department of Geography at The University of British Columbia, is the producer of “” an edited volume exploring perspectives on Indigenous water law, bringing together voices of Indigenous scholars and community members from across Canada. Geoff Mann, Professor of Geography and Director of the Centre for Global Political Economy at Simon Fraser University, has an interest in all aspects of politics and the political economy of capitalism. .

Dr. Mandy Munro-Stasiuk has been appointed as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University. Munro-Stasiuk is the first women to hold the position. With degrees in geography, archaeology, and earth and atmospheric sciences as well as research experience in geomorphology and genocide, Munro-Stasiuk believes her background uniquely positions her to understand the needs of the college’s departments in humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The announcement was made during Women’s History Month. .

Dr. Farhana Sultana has been promoted to Full Professor in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. This promotion marks the first time a woman of color has been promoted to Full Professor in the department’s 80-year history and the second time any woman has reach this rank.


RESOURCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Virtual Launch of You Are Here’s 2022 Issue: Queer Ecologies!

Participate in the virtual launch of the 2022 issue of you are here: the journal of creative geography. yah is a graduate student-run journal housed at the University of Arizona that explores intersection of art and geography. On May 27th at 11am Pacific Time, yah will be gathering on zoom to celebrate the new issue: queer ecologies! Contributors from the issue will be sharing their poetry, visual art, performance, films, etc., and more generally musing on the topics of queer ecologies and creative geographies. For sneak peeks at the issue, follow us at @youarehereUA on Instagram and Twitter.

Kauffman Foundation 2022 Central Standards RFP and 2021 Indicators of Early-Stage Entrepreneurship Report Released, Upcoming Events

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is AAG 2022's gold sponsorThe Kauffman Foundation’s 2022 Central Standards Request for Proposals (RFP) is open for applications. The RFP focuses on supporting entrepreneurship support organizations in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas, providing funds to encourage and accelerate collaborations between two or more entrepreneurship support organizations working together. Proposals will be accepted until May 20. Learn more about the 2022 Central Standards RFP .

The recently released 2021 Kauffman Indicators of Early-Stage Entrepreneurship (KESE) national report highlights data from the past year, providing a look at trends surrounding the rate of new entrepreneurship and the opportunity share of new entrepreneurs. to learn more about the latest data, including statistics on specific demographic groups.

The next virtual Early-Stage Researcher Professional Development session will take place on Friday, May 20 at 1 p.m. CT with mentor Jerome Katz at Saint Louis University. This session is open to 25 early-stage researchers.

May 26th 10 AM CT is the next Entrepreneurship Issues forum: Gig Work and Entrepreneurship. Gig work has received increasing attention in recent years, particularly with the rise of digital platforms. From Uber drivers to Upwork’s “independent professionals,” there is no shortage of platforms enabling individuals and businesses to get services and talent on demand. What does the proliferation of digital platforms — and gig work more broadly — mean for entrepreneurship? This forum will explore the landscape of gig work in the U.S., the various types of gig work people engage in, the relationship between gig work and entrepreneurship, and what this all means for policy and practice.

Call for Participants – Research Study on Scholarly Activity

Tenured/tenure-track faculty members at U.S. college or university, are invited to participate in an online survey about how your research is evaluated by other faculty in your department. Your participation will help to better understand how research evaluation experiences vary by academic field, research area, and researcher demographics, and how these experiences affect faculty career outcomes.

The survey will take approximately 20-25 minutes to complete and you will receive a $20 Amazon gift card for your participation.

If you are willing to participate, please start by complete a brief to determine if you are eligible to participate.


In Memoriam

Photo of J Ronald EytonJ. Ronald Eyton passed away on March 14, 2022. His death, in a hospital in Vancouver, BC, following a sudden illness was unexpected. After a variety of academic appointments at the Assistant (University of Illinois, University of South Carolina) and Associate (Penn State University, University of Alberta) Professor level, Ron moved to Texas State University in 1995. Ron was an important member of the Geography team which resulted in the Department of Geography being awarded the first doctoral program at Texas State University. .

Photo of Lynn UseryDr. Lynn Usery passed from this earthly plane on March 22, 2022 following a brief illness. He will be sorely missed by the geography community, not only for his many research contributions, leadership and vision, and tireless service, but also for his friendship and camaraderie. Michael Tischler of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) wrote, “On paper, we knew him as the Director of the Center of Excellence for Geographic Information Science [CEGIS]. But he was far more than that title would lead one to believe. Lynn leaves a remarkable legacy given his extraordinary scientific accomplishments, presence as a leader in the geographic science community, and impact on individual geographic scientists inside USGS and around the world.” .

Photo of William B KoryDr. William B. Kory, professor emeritus of geography at the University of Pittsburgh–Johnstown, passed away on Saturday, April 2, 2022 in his Florida home. Dr. Kory was unrelentingly committed to his students’ success at Pitt-Johnstown. When the Department of Geography in Pittsburgh disbanded like so many others during the 1980s, Dr. Kory reestablished the University’s undergraduate major in Johnstown. He was also an active member of the Pennsylvania Geographical Society and devoted significant time to editorial duties at The Pennsylvania Geographer. .


Featured Articles

The Mapmaker’s Mantra

Photo of hand holding a compass; credit Garrett Sears, unsplash.comBy Aileen Buckley, Allen Carroll, and Clint Brown

Maps are widely regarded as objective and authoritative sources of information. Over the past decade, news and other information sources have often been distorted on social media, eroding their authority. It’s our hope that we can help avoid a similar erosion of cartographic credibility by drafting this “Mapmaker’s Mantra.”

The Mantra is not a code of ethics for cartography. It focuses solely on mapmaking, not the many other facets of cartography. It aims at the making of maps that convey authoritative information, not maps for advertisements, propaganda, and the like. Its goal is to preserve the authority of maps by reminding the mapmaking community of their ethical and moral responsibility to tell the truth with maps.


GEOGRAPHERS IN THE NEWS

EVENTS CALENDAR

Submit News to the AAG Newsletter. To share your news, email us!

 

    Share

Council Meeting Minutes – February 2022

    Share

The Mapmaker’s Mantra

Photo of hand holding a compass; credit Garrett Sears, unsplash.com

By Aileen Buckley, Allen Carroll, Clint Brown

Maps are widely regarded as objective and authoritative sources of information. Over the past decade, news and other information sources have often been distorted on social media, eroding their authority. It’s our hope that we can help avoid a similar erosion of cartographic credibility by drafting this “Mapmaker’s Mantra.”

The Mantra is not a code of ethics for cartography. It focuses solely on mapmaking, not the many other facets of cartography. It aims at the making of maps that convey authoritative information, not maps for advertisements, propaganda, and the like. Its goal is to preserve the authority of maps by reminding the mapmaking community of their ethical and moral responsibility to tell the truth with maps.

The Mapmaker’s Mantra

Maps made ethically convey their message accurately, justifiably, and thoroughly. As a mirror of the world, they help people to develop deeper geographic understanding which can lead to wiser spatial decision making. Thus, ethical mapmakers recognize the power of maps and do not accept incautious practices in their own work or the work of others. Widespread ethical mapmaking will ensure that the authority of maps endures.

This Mapmaker’s Mantra is presented with the intention of reinforcing ethical behavior in mapmaking:

  • Be Honest and Accurate: The highest objective and primary obligation of ethical mapmakers is to communicate information in the most accurate and understandable way. They strive for veracity and verifiability in all aspects of their mapmaking.
  • Be Transparent and Accountable: Ethical mapmakers take responsibility for their work and are open and transparent about their sources and decisions. They accept that neither speed nor format forgive accountability.
  • Minimize Harm and Seek to Provide Value: Ethical mapmakers treat sources, subjects, colleagues, and members of the public with respect; they promote equity, inclusion, and empathy. They strive to make maps of value to increase understanding and provide insights.
  • Be Humble and Courageous: Ethical mapmakers humbly admit when they get it wrong and gently point out when others get it wrong. They have the courage to admit when they do not know something and call on others when their own skills or knowledge are insufficient.

These basic guiding principles give rise to and provide the justification for rules that help guide and assess a mapmaker’s decisions. Resources related to the rules provide a better understanding of and/or practical experience with the skills needed for ethical mapmaking. The Mapmaker’s Mantra will link to existing rules and resources created or endorsed by professional cartography and GIScience organizations.

What’s Next?

To support discussion and collaboration, we created a user group that will soon go live on the Esri Community called “Ethics in Mapping,” where ideas, guidelines, and best practices can be shared. We can use this community to have conversations, upload files, collaborate on documents, and share videos and other media. The community is also where we can share the links to existing rules and resources.

Knowing how to act ethically is not always obvious. As a community, we can discuss and explore the challenges, requirements, and best practices for ethical mapmaking. Come join us!

Thanks to Charlie Frye, Mark Harrower, and Jim Herries for their comments on early drafts of The Mantra.

To learn more about issues of ethics in geography and cartography, explore the GeoEthics webinar series organized by The AAG and the Center for Spatial Analysis at University of California Santa Barbara.

    Share

New Books for Geographers: Spring 2022

washington dc Take-a-stroll-along-the-Tidal-Basin-in-the-spring-to-catch-a-glimpse-of-the-Jefferson-Memorial-and-the-iconic-Cherry-Blossom-trees-courtesy-of-washington.org_

The AAG compiles a quarterly list of newly published geography books and books of interest to geographers. The list includes a diversity of books that represents the breadth of the discipline (including key sub-disciplines), but also recognizes the work which takes place at the margins of geography and overlap with other disciplines. While academic texts make up most of the books, we also include popular books, novels, books of poetry, and books published in languages other than English, for example.

Some of these books are selected for review in the AAG Review of Books. Publishers are welcome to contact the AAG Review of Books Editor-in-Chief Debbie Hopkins, as well as anyone interested in reviewing these or other titles.


The Accidental Ecosystem: People and Wildlife in American Cities by Peter S. Alagona (University of California Press, 2022)

Across Iceland: With Illustrations and Maps, and an Appendix on the Plants Collected by William Bisiker (Cambridge UP, 2021)

Airbnb, Short-Term Rentals and the Future of Housing by Lily M. Hoffman and Barbara Schmitter Heisler (Routledge, 2021)

All We Can Save by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine K. Wilkinson (Penguin Random House, 2021)

American Geography: A Reckoning with a Dream by Matt Black (Thames & Hudson, 2021)

The Anthropocene Unconscious by Mark Bould (Verso Books, 2021)

The Authorship of Place: A Cultural Geography of the New Chinese Cinemas by Dennis Lo (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Bearing Witness: The Human Rights Case Against Fracking and Climate Change by Thomas A. Kerns, Kathleen Dean Moore (Oregon State University Press, 2021)

Beautyscapes: Mapping cosmetic surgery tourism by Ruth Holliday, Meredith Jones, & David Bell (Manchester UP, 2021)

A Behavioural Theory of Economic Development by Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-fatness as Anti-Blackness by Da’Shaun Harrison (Penguin Random House, 2021)

Biotic Borders: Transpacific Plant and Insect Migration and the Rise of Anti-Asian Racism in America, 1890–1950 by Jeannie N. Shinozuka (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Bitter Shade: The Ecological Challenge of Human Consciousness by Michael R. Dove (Yale University Press, 2021)

Border Humanitarians: Gendered Order and Insecurity on the Thai-Burmese Frontier by Adam Saltsman (Syracuse University Press, 2022)

Border Wars: The conflicts of tomorrow by Klaus Dodds (Penguin, 2021)

Borderland Circuitry: Immigration Surveillance in the United States and Beyond by Ana Muñiz (University of California Press, 2022)

Bread & Water by dee Hobsbawn-Smith (NYU Press, 2021)

Breaking Through: Understanding Sovereignty and Security in the Circumpolar Arctic by editors Wilfrid Greaves & P. Whitney Lackenbauer (U Toronto Press, 2021)

Canada’s Past and Future in Latin America by Pablo Heidrich and Laura Macdonald (University of Toronto Press, 2022)

Canyon, Mountain, Cloud: Absence and Longing in American Parks by Tyra A. Olstad (Oregon State University Press, 2021)

Capitalism and The Sea by Liam Campling and Alejandro Colás (Verso Books, 2021)

Capitalism and the Sea: The Maritime Factor in the Making of the Modern World by Liam Campling & Alejandro Colás (Verso Books, 2021)

A Carceral Ecology: Ushuaia and the History of Landscape and Punishment in Argentina by Ryan C. Edwards (University of California Press, 2021)

Choosing the Future: Technology and Opportunity in Communities by Karen Mossberger, Caroline J. Tolbert, & Scott J. LaCombe (Oxford UP, 2021)

Cities of Power: the Urban, the National, the Popular, the Global by Göran Therborn (Penguin Random House, 2021)

Citizens of Everywhere: Searching for Identity in the Age of Brexit by Peter Gumbel (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

City Living by Quill R Kukla (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Climate Change in the Middle East and North Africa: 15,000 Years of Crises, Setbacks, and Adaptation by William R. Thompson and Leila Zakhirova (Routledge, 2021)

Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal by Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin (Verso Books, 2021)

Climate Ghosts: Migratory Species in the Anthropocene by Nancy Langston (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

The Climate Coup by Mark Alizart (Polity Press, 2021)

Climate, Catastrophe, and Faith by Philip Jenkins (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Coercive Geographies: Historicizing Mobility, Labor and Confinement by editors Johan Heinsen, Martin Bak Jørgensen, &Martin Ottovay Jørgensen (Haymarket Books, 2021)

The Coldest Coast: The 1873 Leigh Smith Expedition to Svalbard in the Diaries and Photographs of Herbert Chermside by editors P. J. Capelotti, (illu.) Grenna Museum (Springer International, 2021)

Colossus: The Anatomy of Delhi by Sanjoy Chakravorty & Neelanjan Sircar (Cambridge UP, 2021)

The Commerce of Cartography: Making and Marketing Maps in Eighteenth-Century France and England by Mary Sponberg Pedley (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

The Commerce of Geography: Making and Marketing Maps in Eighteenth-Century France and England by Mary Sponberg Pedley (Chicaco UP, 2021)

Confederate Exodus: Social and Environmental Forces in the Migration of U.S. Southerners to Brazil by Alan Marcus (University of Nebraska Press, 2021)

Conservation of Tropical Coral Reefs (2021) by B McFarland (Palgrave, 2021)

Counterpoints: A San Francisco Bay Area Atlas of Displacement & Resistance  by by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project with a foreword by Ananya Roy & Chris Carlsson. (PM Press, 2021)

Crooked Cats: Beastly Encounters in the Anthropocene by Nayanika Mathur (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Crossing the Divide by Robert E.B. Lucas (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Decolonial Feminisms, Power and Place by Rodriguez Castro, Laura (Palgrave, 2021)

Decolonising Blue Spaces in the Anthropocene (2021) by M Parsons, K Fisher and RP Crease (Palgrave, 2021)

Deep Adaptation: Navigating the Realities of Climate Chaos by Jem Bendell, Rupert Read (Polity Press, 2021)

Delivering Water and Power: GIS for Utilities by Pat Hohl & Keith Mann (ESRI Press, 2021)

The Diasporic Condition by Ghassan Hage (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

The Diasporic Condition: Ethnographic Explorations of the Lebanese in the World by Ghassan Hage (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Disentangling: The Geographies of Digital Disconnection by editors André Jansson & Paul C. Adams (Oxford UP, 2021)

Economic Poisoning: Industrial Waste and the Chemicalization of American Agriculture by Adam M. Romero (University of California Press, 2021)

Fathoms: The World in the Whale by Rebecca Giggs (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

Feminist City by Leslie Kern (Verso Books, 2021)

Feminist Geographies Unbound by Gokariksel, B., Hawkins, M., Neubert, C. & Smith, S.  (West Virginia University Press, 2021)

Freedom of the Border by Paul Scheffer (Polity Press, 2021)

From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way by Michael Bond (Harvard UP (Belknap Press), 2021)

Geographic Citizen Science Design by Artemis Skarlatidou, Muki Haklay (UCL Press, 2021)

Geographies of India by George Duncan (Repro Books, 2021)

A Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors by Mikhail S. Blinnikov (Guilford Press, 2021)

A Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors (2nd ed) by Mikhail Blinnikov (Guilford Press, 2021)

Global Health and the Villiage by Sarah Rudrum (University of Toronto Press, 2021)

Global Production Networks and Rural Development: Southeast Asia as a Fruit Supplier to China by editors Bill Pritchard (Edward Elgar, 2021)

Going Remote: How the Flexible Work Economy Can Improve Our Lives and Our Cities by Matthew E. Kahn (University of California Press, 2022)

Governing Migration Beyond the State  by Andrew Geddes (OUP, 2021)

The Great Adaptation by Romain Felli (Verso Books, 2021)

Ground Sea:  Photography and the Right to Be Reborn by Hilde Van Gelder (Cornell University Press, 2021)

Home: 100 Poems by Christian Wiman (Yale University Press, 2021)

How Green Became Good by Hillary Angelo (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

How London Was Captured by the Super-Rich by Rowland Atkinson (Verso Books, 2021)

How to Blow Up a Pipeline: Learning to fight a world on fire by Andreas Malm  (Verso, 2021)

How to Build a Global City by Michelle Acuto (Cornell University Press, 2022)

Imagined Geographies: The Maritime Silk Roads in World History, 100–1800 by Geoffrey C. Gunn (Hong Kong University Press, 2021)

Imagining the Heartland: White Supremacy and the American Midwest by Britt E. Halverson, Joshua O. Reno (University of California Press, 2022)

Indians, Fire, and the Land in the Pacific Northwest by Robert T. Boyd (Oregon State University Press, 2021)

Intersecting Lives: How Place Shapes Reentry by Andrea M. Leverentz (University of California Press, 2022)

ntra-Africa Migrations: Reimagining Borders and Migration Management  by Inocent Moyo, Jussi P Laine, Christopher Changwe Nshimbi (Routledge, 2021)

Island of Hope: Migration and Solidarity in the Mediterranean by Megan A. Carney (University of California Press, 2021)

Killer Cities by Nigel Thrift (Sage Publishing, 2021)

Krakow: An Ecobiography by editors Adam Izdebski & Rafał Szmytka (U of Pittsburgh Press, 2021)

Labor in the Age of Finance: Pensions, Politics and Corporations from Deindustrialization to Dodd-Frank by Sanford M Jacoby (Princeton University Press, 2021)

Land Fictions by Asher Ghertner and Robert Lake (Cornell Press, 2021)

Latecomer State Formation: Political Geography and Capacity Failure in Latin America by Sebastian Mazzuca (Yale UP, 2021)

Latin American Literature at the Millennium: Local Lives, Global Spaces by Cecily Raynor  (Bucknell UP, 2021)

Latitude: The astonishing journey to discover the shape of the earth by Nicholas Crane (Penguin Books, 2021)

Latitude: The True Story of the World’s First Scientific Expedition by Nicholas Crane (Simon & Schuster, 2021)

Life in Plastic Artistic Responses to Petromodernity by Caren Irr (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Living as a Bird by Vinciane Despret (Polity Press, 2021)

 Living Off-grid in Wales: Eco-Villages in Policy and Practice  by Elaine Forde (University of Wales Press, 2021)

Living with Pandemics: Places, People and Policy by editors John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres, Aksel Ersoy, & Louise Reardon (Edward Elgar, 2021)

Madhouse at the End of the Earth: The Belgica’s Journey into the Dark Antarctic Night by Julian Sancton (Ebury, 2021)

Manhattan to Minisink: American Indian Place Names of Greater New York and Vicinity by Robert Grumet (U Oklahoma Press, 2021)

Mapping Nature Across North America by editors Kathleen A. Brosnan & James R. Akerman (Chicago UP, *2021)

Mapping Nature across the Americas by Kathleen A. Brosnan, James R. Akerman (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Mapping the Amazon: Literary Geography after the Rubber Boom by Amanda Smith (Liverpool UP, 2021)

Migration Studies and Colonialism by Lucy Mayblin, Joe Turner (Polity Press, 2021)

Morning Star Rising: The Politics of Decolonization in West Papua by Camellia Webb-Gannon (University of Hawaii Press, 2021)

Move: The Forces Uprooting Us by Parag Khanna (Simon & Schuster, 2021)

The Moving City: Scenes from the Delhi Metro and the Social Life of Infrastructure by Rashmi Sadana (University of California Press, 2021)

The Nature of Space by Milton Santos (Duke University Press, 2021)

The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis by Amitav Ghosh (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Of Bridges: A Poetic and Philosophical Account by Thomas Harrison (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Open Hand, Closed Fist: Practices of Undocumented Organizing in a Hostile State by Kathryn Abrams (University of California Press, 2022)

Our Common Ground: A History of America’s Public Lands by John D. Leshy (Yale University Press, 2021)

Place: Towards a Geophilosophy of Photography by Ali Shobeiri (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Planetary Politics: A Manifesto by Lorenzo Marsili (Polity Press, 2021)

Politics and the Environment in Eastern Europe by editors Eszter Krasznai Kovacs (OpenBook, 2021)

The Politics of Fear in South Sudan Generating Chaos, Creating Conflict by Daniel Akech Thiong (ZED, 2021)

The Porch: Meditations on the Edge of Nature by Charlie Hailey (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Post Growth: Life after Capitalism by Tim Jackson (Polity Press, 2021)

The Power of Geography: Ten Maps That Reveal the Future of Our World by Tim Marshall (Elliot & Thompson, 2021)

Practicing Cooperation Mutual Aid beyond Capitalism by Andrew Zitcer (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Protecting the Places We Love: Conservation Strategies for Entrusted Lands and Parks by Breece Robertson (ESRI Press, 2021)

Pushed Out: Contested Development and Rural Gentrification in the US West by Ryanne Pilgeram (U Washington Press, 2021)

The Radical Bookstore Counterspace for Social Movements by Kimberley Kinder (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Reimagining Sustainable Cities by Stephen M. Wheeler, Christina D. Rosan (University of California Press, 2021)

Remapping the Contested Sinosphere: The Cross-cultural Landscape and Ethnoscape of Taiwan by Chia-rong Wu (Cambria Press, 2021)

Remembering Our Intimacies: Mo’olelo, Aloha ‘Āina, and Ea by Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate by Kenneth H. Kolb (University of California Press, 2021)

The Return of Nature by John Bellamy Foster (NYU Press, 2021)

Sapphos Legacy: Convivial Economics on a Greek Isle by Marina Karides (SUNY Press, 2021)

Saving Animals Multispecies Ecologies of Rescue and Care by Elan Abrell (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Saving Us: A Climate Scientist’s Case for Gope and Healing in a Divided World by Katharine Hayhoe (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

Settler Colonial City Racism and Inequity in Postwar Minneapolis by David Hugill (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Seven Ethics Against Capitalism: Towards a Planetary Commons by Oli Mould (Polity Press, 2021)

Shaking Up the City: Ignorance, Inequality, and the Urban Question  by Tom Slater (University of California Press, 2021)

Shaking Up the CityIgnorance, Inequality, and the Urban Question by Tom Slater (University of California Press, 2021)

Slowdown: The End of the Great Acceleration – and Why It’s a Good Thing Updated Edition by Danny Dorling (Yale University Press, 2021)

The Spacious World by Ricardo Padrón (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Sounding Jewish in Berlin by Phil Alexander (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Spatial Webs: Mapping Anatolian Pasts for Research and the Public by Christopher H. Roosevelt (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

Spatializing Authoritarianism by Natalie Koch (Syracuse University Press, 2022)

Streetlife by Conrad Kickert and Emily Talen (University of Toronto Press, 2021)

Sweat and Salt Water: Selected Works by Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa, compiled and edited by Katerina Teaiwa, April K. Henderson, and Terence Wesley-Smith (University of Hawaii Press, 2021)

Tanzania’s Informal Economy: The Micro-politics of Street Vending by Alexis Malefakis (ZED, 2021)

Temporality in Mobile Lives: Contemporary Asia–Australia Migration and Everyday Time by Shanthi Robertson (Bristol University press, 2022)

Thanks for Everything (Now Get Out) by Joseph Margulies  (Yale University Press, 2021)

The Three Sustainabilities Energy, Economy, Time by Allan Stoekl (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Time For Socialism by Thomas Picketty (Yale University Press, 2021)

To Rule the Waves: How Control of the World’s Oceans Shapes the Fate of the Superpowers by Bruce Jones (Simon & Schuster, 2021)

Transnational Flows and Permissive Polities Ethnographies of Human Mobilities in Asia by Barak Kalir, Malini Sur (Amsterdam University Press, 2021)

Unsettling Utopia The Making and Unmaking of French India (June 2021 by Jessica Namakkal (Columbia University Press, 2021)

The Urban Planning Imagination: A Critical International Introduction by Nicholas A. Phelps (Polity Press, 2021)

Visions of Beirut: The Urban Life of Media Infrastructure by Hatim El-Hibri (Duke UP, 2021)

Voluminous States by Franck Billé (Duke University Press, 2021)

Water for All: Community, Property, and Revolution in Modern Bolivia  by Sarah T. Hines (University of California Press, 2021)

Watershed Attending to Body and Earth in Distress by Ranae Lenor Hanson (University of Minnesota Press, 2021)

Waves Across the South: A New History of Revolution and Empire by Sujit Sivasundaram (University of Chicago Press, 2021)

White Borders by Reece Jones (Penguin Random House, 2021)

A World Without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet by Jo Handelsman (Yale University Press, 2021)

The Yellow River by Ruth Mostern (Yale University Press, 2021)

You Better Go See Geri: An Odawa Elder’s Life of Recovery and Resilience   by Frances ‘Geri’ Roossien, Andrea Riley Mukavetz (Oregon State University Press, 2021)

    Share

Geography Faculty Development Alliance – Early Career and Department Leadership Workshops

The Geography Faculty Development Alliance (GFDA) Early Career Workshop class of 2017 gathered for a photo at the close of the conference on June 24 at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tenn

The Geography Faculty Development Alliance (GFDA) is a long-term, broad-based project to provide early career faculty and advanced doctoral students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to excel within the full range of their profession activities—teaching, research, and service-leadership. Key objectives of GFDA are to foster a culture of support and success for early career faculty, to help them understand the fundamental interconnections between their teaching and research, and to advance the scholarship of teaching and learning across the entire discipline. GFDA is also committed to assisting early career professionals in addressing the important issues of diversity & inclusion, public outreach, science advocacy, communication skills, work/life balance, the tenure/promotion process.

This project involves several components: summer workshops including the Early Career Faculty Workshop and the Department Leadership Workshop, follow-up seminars, panel discussions, and paper sessions at the annual meetings of the American Association of Geographers and the National Council for Geographic Education. There is also a longitudinal evaluation and research component to consider the value of the training to early career faculty during the tenure review process. A final component has involved publishing the workshop materials as a stand-alone course for use in graduate geography programs, including the books Aspiring Academics (2009) and Teaching College Geography (2009).

GFDA was founded by Professor Ken Foote of the University of Connecticut with the support of the National Science Foundation and the AAG.


 

Early Career Workshop

The early career workshop is open to graduate students and faculty who are just beginning their careers in higher education — instructors, lecturers, assistant professors, and other untenured faculty. The one-week program is open to faculty from all types of teaching and research institutions inside and outside the US. The workshop, sponsored by the American Association of Geographers, focuses on topics which are frequently the greatest sources of stress in the first years of a faculty appointment, including:

  • Developing significant learning experiences for your students
  • Career planning
  • Time management
  • Getting the most out of academic conferences
  • Ethics in research, teaching, and advising
  • Nuts-and-bolts issues about writing and publishing
  • Preparing a CV, job search and interviewing
  • Promoting collegiality
  • Preparing for the tenure process
  • Balancing personal and professional life

The workshop touches on issues of teaching and learning, particularly those revolving around designing effective courses, issues of diversity and inclusion, and active pedagogy. The goal of the workshop is to help participants balance the many responsibilities of academic life and to understand how their teaching, research, service, outreach, and personal lives intersect and interconnect. Most participants have built lasting networks among themselves and with workshop leaders.

You do not need to be a member of AAG to register for the workshop. Simply follow the instructions to sign up for an explorer account if you are not an AAG member. Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

Department Leadership Workshop

Departments are increasingly concerned with survival in a time of disruption and change in higher education. The Department Leadership Workshop focuses on helping our members respond effectively to these changes through strong management, shared governance, and deep understanding of the challenges and opportunities they may face in coming years. What are the measures of success for departments? How can departments strategically position themselves to generate student credit hours, attract diverse majors, support faculty research and publication, innovate in high-impact learning practices, and collect evidence that they are achieving these and other goals? The workshop features presentations and discussions on a wide range of topic of interest to leaders in geography such as strategic planning and self-study reports, social media and marketing, recruiting for diversity and inclusion, and supporting mid-career and late-career faculty.

The Department Leadership Workshop is for all geographers interested in improving their programs — chairs/heads, associate chairs/heads, deans, academic advisors, provosts and other administrators, as well as all faculty interested in leadership issues. The workshop is particularly well suited for individuals who may soon assume leadership positions. Participants will also have an opportunity to meet, learn with, and share some meals with early career faculty attending the Geography Faculty Development Alliance workshop during the same week.

Time will also be set aside for participants to share and discuss their own concerns and experiences. One of the most important elements of the workshop is the opportunity it affords everyone to learn from and network with new and experienced leaders and administrators.

    Share

Newsletter – March-April 2022

Would you like to receive this newsletter in your email inbox? Sign up for a free AAG account now and select AAG Newsletter under your communication preferences.


PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

Do Look Up

By Emily Yeh

The 2020 Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado, the largest wildfire in the state’s history. Credit: Phil Millette, National Interagency Fire Center

In a recent review of Don’t Look Up, the terrifyingly close-to-home satire of collective inaction on global warming, Pablo Ortiz of the Union of Concerned Scientists suggests that one form of “looking up” is to write and share about how climate change is affecting you, as a means of building a larger movement… taking Ortiz’s advice, I begin here by briefly describing one way climate change is affecting the place I live.


ANNUAL MEETING

AAG 2023 Denver Postcard - Bird's eye view of Denver, Colorado, 1908 vintage mapSave the Date for AAG 2023 in Denver

Join us for the Mile-High meeting. Mark your calendar for the hybrid AAG Annual Meeting in Denver, CO on March 23-27, 2023. We invite you to organize and participate in sessions, workshops, field trips, special events, and activities. Look for more information throughout the summer to help you plan. We look forward to seeing you online and in the Rocky Mountains.


PUBLICATIONS

NEW Annals of the American Association of Geographers Issue Alert: The 2022 Special Issue of the Annals on Displacements

Annals journal coverThe Annals publishes a special issue each year to highlight research around a specific theme of global importance. The contains 26 articles on the topic of Displacements and is guest edited by Kendra Strauss. The articles are divided into five sections: Theorizing Displacements; Understanding Experiences of Displacement: Concepts, Methodologies, and Data; Urbanization and Infrastructures; Bringing in the State; and Politics and Praxis. The 2022 Special Issue on “Displacements” explores how, building on our history of critical engagement with place, geographers from across the discipline can contribute empirical, theoretical, and methodological insights on displacements and their implications. Contributions addressing displacements through multi- and -inter-disciplinary engagements with geographical theory and methods are from a broad range of perspectives, locations, and historical and contemporary contexts.

All AAG members have full online access to all issues of the Annals through the Journals section of the . Read more about the Annals Special Issue .

Questions about the Annals? Contact .

NEW The Professional Geographer Issue Alert: Articles with topics ranging from pedestrian access to K-12 schools to Finnish sauna diplomacy

The Professional Geographer Cover FlatThe latest issue of The Professional Geographer is now available () with 10 new research articles plus a six article focus on . Article topics include ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and . Study areas include ; ; and . Authors are from a variety of global institutions including: ; ; ; and .

All AAG members have full online access to all issues of The Professional Geographer through their member dashboard. Each issue, the editors choose one article to make freely available. In this issue you can read by Matthew R. Lehnerta and Seth Alan Williams for free.

Questions about The Professional Geographer? Contact .

NEW Issue of The AAG Review of Books Published

Review-of-Books-Cover

The latest issue of The AAG Review of Books is now available () with 7 book reviews on recent books related to geography, public policy and international affairs. The new issue also includes a film review of the documentary Holding Tightly: Custom and Healing in Timor-Leste and two book review fora. 2022 marks the ten-year anniversary of The AAG Review of Books and this issue includes from current editor Debbie Hopkins.

Questions about The AAG Review of Books? Contact .

In addition to the most recently published journal, read the latest issue of the other AAG journals online:

• Annals of the American Association of Geographers
• The Professional Geographer
• GeoHumanities
• The AAG Review of Books


ASSOCIATION NEWS

Support the AAG Student Travel Fund — Make a Difference in the Life of a Young Geographer

One of AAG’s top fund-raising priorities for 2022 will be the AAG Student Travel Fund. We will launch this fund-raising effort in the coming days via email.

As we all realize, nothing can take the place of the meeting experience. It’s so valuable to presenting your research, networking, and connecting with colleagues. With the pandemic behind us, and the annual meeting now transformed into a hybrid (in-person with some virtual presenters) and virtual experience, we need to support our students. They have patiently waited to return to the new normal and now are faced with rising travel costs and diminished conference budgets that may make attending the 2023 AAG Annual Meeting challenging.

Our goal is to support at least 100 students and to offer enrichment awards of up to $500 to support their travel and/or participation as a hybrid or virtual attendee. .

Have Your Department or Program Featured in Recruitment Video

A World of Possibilities video still showing an illustration of a map of North America with network lines hovering overLast fall, AAG worked with Green Jay Strategies to produce the “” video, designed to be used to recruit students into geography programs. Many programs took advantage of our offer to customize the video with your logo and contact information, so we are extending that offer again this year. To see an example of how your information will be featured in the video, .

Getting your customized copy is especially valuable this year, as AAG’s 2022 Geography Awareness Week theme will be tied to the video. If you would like to get a version featuring information for your program, please send an email to and include your approved logo, department/program name, contact person, contact website, contact email, and contact phone number. Please also include the email address where you would like the final video sent.

Please submit all requests by May 20. The final video will be emailed back to you in early June.

The video is aimed at students who are early in their process of discovering a geography degree and considers the research of Dr. Justin Stoler (University of Miami) on the understanding and preferences of undergraduate students. We would like to again thank AAG members Dr. Debarchana Ghosh, Dr. Deborah Thomas, Dr. Jacqueline Housel, Dr. Jason Post, Dr. Justin Stoler, and Dr. Wan Yu for their roles in helping shape this video and the AAG COVID-19 Response subcommittee for proposing this project.

Spots Available in AAG’s New Expanded Professional Development Webinar Series

Photo of African American woman participating in an online program on her laptop while taking notesHave you signed up for one of our Professional Development Webinar Series yet? Whether you’re a student, recent graduate, job seeker, department head, or a career geography professional, AAG has an event that is right for you.

Our coming webinars include:

. Hear from geographers who have successfully utilized their degrees to launch careers in these sought-after fields.

. Explore ways geographers are influencing policy and aiding social movements.

. Hear from geographers carving out career paths with a focal point outside of GIS or GIS-related experience.

!

Registration Open for Summer Series for Grad Students and Recent Graduates

Photo of African American student writing notes in notebook with book and laptop at a cafe tableThe AAG 2022 Virtual Summer Series is back. Sign-ups are open for our Graduate Forums and Seminars, which will continue throughout the summer.

Our are led by the AAG Graduate Student Affinity Group and will offer graduate students with sessions that enable them to network and feel a sense of community.

Our target Master’s or Doctoral students in Geography programs and recently graduated geographers, and cover a wide range of practical topics.

Take Part in the AAG’s Graduate Faculty Development Alliance Workshops, June 13-17

Participants of the 2008 GFDA workshop gather for a photoTwo summer professional development workshops from the AAG’s Graduate Faculty Development Alliance will continue online in 2022. Registration will be filled on a first come, first served basis and is free for AAG Members and $150 for non-members.

Department Chairs, Heads, new Deans, and other emerging leaders — develop the tools you need to do your job, network with peers, and learn from top leadership professionals in an inclusive, innovative, and interactive series.

The AAG Geography Faculty Development Alliance for early career geographers, as well as non-AAG members who are graduate students or teaching geography in higher education, offers an innovative, new online approach to the highly successful early career workshops that have been offered since 2002.

.


Member News

May Member Updates

Dr. Andrew Sluyter, Professor of Geography at Louisiana State University, has received a highly prestigious . The foundation awarded 28 fellowships from 300 extraordinary scholars nominated by the leaders of select universities and other preeminent institutions. Each fellow receives $200,000 over two years to support visionary scholarship on important and enduring issues confronting our society.

Two geographers have been named to the 2022 class of Guggenheim Fellows. Karen Bakker, a Professor in the Department of Geography at The University of British Columbia, is the producer of “” an edited volume exploring perspectives on Indigenous water law, bringing together voices of Indigenous scholars and community members from across Canada. Geoff Mann, Professor of Geography and Director of the Centre for Global Political Economy at Simon Fraser University, has an interest in all aspects of politics and the political economy of capitalism. .

Dr. Mandy Munro-Stasiuk has been appointed as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University. Munro-Stasiuk is the first women to hold the position. With degrees in geography, archaeology, and earth and atmospheric sciences as well as research experience in geomorphology and genocide, Munro-Stasiuk believes her background uniquely positions her to understand the needs of the college’s departments in humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The announcement was made during Women’s History Month. .

Dr. Farhana Sultana has been promoted to Full Professor in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. This promotion marks the first time a woman of color has been promoted to Full Professor in the department’s 80-year history and the second time any woman has reach this rank.


RESOURCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Virtual Launch of You Are Here’s 2022 Issue: Queer Ecologies!

Participate in the virtual launch of the 2022 issue of you are here: the journal of creative geography. yah is a graduate student-run journal housed at the University of Arizona that explores intersection of art and geography. On May 27th at 11am Pacific Time, yah will be gathering on zoom to celebrate the new issue: queer ecologies! Contributors from the issue will be sharing their poetry, visual art, performance, films, etc., and more generally musing on the topics of queer ecologies and creative geographies. For sneak peeks at the issue, follow us at @youarehereUA on Instagram and Twitter.

Kauffman Foundation 2022 Central Standards RFP and 2021 Indicators of Early-Stage Entrepreneurship Report Released, Upcoming Events

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is AAG 2022's gold sponsorThe Kauffman Foundation’s 2022 Central Standards Request for Proposals (RFP) is open for applications. The RFP focuses on supporting entrepreneurship support organizations in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas, providing funds to encourage and accelerate collaborations between two or more entrepreneurship support organizations working together. Proposals will be accepted until May 20. Learn more about the 2022 Central Standards RFP .

The recently released 2021 Kauffman Indicators of Early-Stage Entrepreneurship (KESE) national report highlights data from the past year, providing a look at trends surrounding the rate of new entrepreneurship and the opportunity share of new entrepreneurs. to learn more about the latest data, including statistics on specific demographic groups.

The next virtual Early-Stage Researcher Professional Development session will take place on Friday, May 20 at 1 p.m. CT with mentor Jerome Katz at Saint Louis University. This session is open to 25 early-stage researchers.

May 26th 10 AM CT is the next Entrepreneurship Issues forum: Gig Work and Entrepreneurship. Gig work has received increasing attention in recent years, particularly with the rise of digital platforms. From Uber drivers to Upwork’s “independent professionals,” there is no shortage of platforms enabling individuals and businesses to get services and talent on demand. What does the proliferation of digital platforms — and gig work more broadly — mean for entrepreneurship? This forum will explore the landscape of gig work in the U.S., the various types of gig work people engage in, the relationship between gig work and entrepreneurship, and what this all means for policy and practice.

Call for Participants – Research Study on Scholarly Activity

Tenured/tenure-track faculty members at U.S. college or university, are invited to participate in an online survey about how your research is evaluated by other faculty in your department. Your participation will help to better understand how research evaluation experiences vary by academic field, research area, and researcher demographics, and how these experiences affect faculty career outcomes.

The survey will take approximately 20-25 minutes to complete and you will receive a $20 Amazon gift card for your participation.

If you are willing to participate, please start by complete a brief to determine if you are eligible to participate.


In Memoriam

Photo of J Ronald EytonJ. Ronald Eyton passed away on March 14, 2022. His death, in a hospital in Vancouver, BC, following a sudden illness was unexpected. After a variety of academic appointments at the Assistant (University of Illinois, University of South Carolina) and Associate (Penn State University, University of Alberta) Professor level, Ron moved to Texas State University in 1995. Ron was an important member of the Geography team which resulted in the Department of Geography being awarded the first doctoral program at Texas State University. .

Photo of Lynn UseryDr. Lynn Usery passed from this earthly plane on March 22, 2022 following a brief illness. He will be sorely missed by the geography community, not only for his many research contributions, leadership and vision, and tireless service, but also for his friendship and camaraderie. Michael Tischler of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) wrote, “On paper, we knew him as the Director of the Center of Excellence for Geographic Information Science [CEGIS]. But he was far more than that title would lead one to believe. Lynn leaves a remarkable legacy given his extraordinary scientific accomplishments, presence as a leader in the geographic science community, and impact on individual geographic scientists inside USGS and around the world.” .

Photo of William B KoryDr. William B. Kory, professor emeritus of geography at the University of Pittsburgh–Johnstown, passed away on Saturday, April 2, 2022 in his Florida home. Dr. Kory was unrelentingly committed to his students’ success at Pitt-Johnstown. When the Department of Geography in Pittsburgh disbanded like so many others during the 1980s, Dr. Kory reestablished the University’s undergraduate major in Johnstown. He was also an active member of the Pennsylvania Geographical Society and devoted significant time to editorial duties at The Pennsylvania Geographer. .


Featured Articles

The Mapmaker’s Mantra

Photo of hand holding a compass; credit Garrett Sears, unsplash.comBy Aileen Buckley, Allen Carroll, and Clint Brown

Maps are widely regarded as objective and authoritative sources of information. Over the past decade, news and other information sources have often been distorted on social media, eroding their authority. It’s our hope that we can help avoid a similar erosion of cartographic credibility by drafting this “Mapmaker’s Mantra.”

The Mantra is not a code of ethics for cartography. It focuses solely on mapmaking, not the many other facets of cartography. It aims at the making of maps that convey authoritative information, not maps for advertisements, propaganda, and the like. Its goal is to preserve the authority of maps by reminding the mapmaking community of their ethical and moral responsibility to tell the truth with maps.


GEOGRAPHERS IN THE NEWS

EVENTS CALENDAR

Submit News to the AAG Newsletter. To share your news, email us!

 

    Share

Petition of Support for Ukraine and Those Impacted by Russia’s Military Action

    Share

AAG Announces 2021 Book Awards 

The AAG is pleased to announce the recipients of the three 2021 AAG Book Awards: the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize, the AAG Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography, and the AAG Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work in Geography. The AAG Book Awards mark distinguished and outstanding works published by geography authors during the previous year, 2021. The awardees will be formally recognized at a future event when it is safe to do so. 

The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize

This award encourages and rewards American geographers who write books about the United States which convey the insights of professional geography in language that is both interesting and attractive to lay readers. 

Profiting from the Peak book coverJohn Harner, Profiting from the Peak: Landscape and Liberty in Colorado Springs

(University Press of Colorado, 2021) 

John Harner’s Profiting from the Peak: Landscape and Liberty in Colorado Springs triumphs as an accessibly written, wonderfully illustrated historical geography of a distinctive American place. Dedicated to Peirce Lewis, the book explores how Colorado Springs profited from its singular physical setting as well as its highly distinctive cultural evolution. Laced with dozens of grayscale and color maps and photographs, Harner brings to life a landscape shaped by various forces which are engagingly summarized in nine thematic chapters. 

Harner describes the shaping power of Grass, Water, Air, Metal, Rock, Fun, War, Liberty, and God as he crafts his historical narrative, taking us from Native hunters on the short-grass plains to twenty-first century evangelists who envision the place as a Front-Range crucible of conservative politics. Harner concludes this lovingly crafted and beautifully designed book by arguing that the Springs’ special sense of place derives from its physical setting, its vibrant downtown, and from the unique cultural values of its population. 

The AAG is pleased to recognize John Harner with the 2021 John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize.


The AAG Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography

This award is given for a book written or co-authored by a geographer that conveys most powerfully the nature and importance of geography to the non-academic world. 

Atlas of the Invisible book coverJames Cheshire and Oliver Uberti, Atlas of the Invisible

(W.W. Norton & Company, 2021) 

James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti’s Atlas of the Invisible is a stunning collection of maps and visualizations that tells the stories of our past, present, and future – turning massive datasets into inviting, intriguing, and sometimes disturbing presentations for both geographers and a broader audience. The volume displays the expertise of Cheshire in geographic data analysis and Uberti in cartography, addressing a wide range of topics from historical geography and climate change to geopolitics and social justice. Compelling essays explore myriad ideas and debates in the discipline: the history of mapping from Alexander von Humboldt to GIS, the power of mapping from redlining and gentrification to lead poisoning and air quality, the ethics and use of mobile phone data – even the role of data and mapping in a crisis as the approaching pandemic turned the abstract and invisible into the present and deadly. 

This is a book that geographers everywhere will recommend to non-geographers with pride. The authors hope that their work will move us from being simply spectators: “We hope that at least one of our stories will have inspired you to act.” Little doubt of that, and little surprise that this volume is scheduled for translation into nine languages. A far broader audience will become happily lost in what Cheshire and Uberti have found.


The AAG Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work in Geography

This award is given for a book written by a geographer that makes an unusually important contribution to advancing the science and art of geography.  

Dear Science and Other Stories book coverKatherine McKittrick, Dear Science and Other Stories

(Duke University Press, 2021) 

Dr. Katherine McKittrick’s Dear Science and Other Stories is the recipient of the 2021 American Association of Geographers’ Meridian Book Award, which recognizes a book published in the past year that makes an unusually important contribution to advancing the art and science of geography. 

Dear Science presents incredibly rich conceptual and methodological contributions for researchers in human geography and beyond. This innovative book traces how multiple forms of Black scholarship, art, and indeed, Black life, move through and beyond the straits of knowledge systems co-constituted with and emergent from white supremacy. It compels the reader to contend with their own spatial praxis through a concerted meditation on metaphor and memory and advances current debates in geography by introducing insights from a broad range of archives and interdisciplinary voices. 

McKittrick’s writing on the forms of productive and destructive erasure that confront Black geographies will become necessary and likely transformative reading for scholars within and beyond the discipline. 

The AAG is pleased to recognize Katherine McKittrick with its 2021 Meridian Book Award. 

The 2021 AAG Meridian Book Award Honorable Mention 

Palm Oil Diaspora book coverCase Watkins, Palm Oil Diaspora: Afro-Brazilian Landscapes and Economies on Bahia’s Dendê Coast (Cambridge University Press, 2021) is an exemplary piece that is certain to withstand the test of time. The longstanding influence of the author’s academic lineage extending from Sauer to Parsons, Denevan, Turner, Doolittle, and Sluyter is evident in the work. Moreover, through the integration of previously uncovered evidence, this book offers new perspectives and raises questions concerning the impact of racism and colonial ways of knowing on academic scholarship. 

The Radical Bookstore book coverKimberley Kinder, The Radical Bookstore: Counterspace for Social Movements (University of Minnesota Press, 2021) presents a new paradigm emerging in American geographic thought that is oriented toward social justice. Splendidly written, The Radical Bookstore not only offers a glimpse behind the scenes of a unique type of establishment that seeks to bring voice to marginalized peoples and perspectives, but it also challenges scholars to explore social movements through the lens of constructive activism. 

    Share

AAG Announces 2022 Award Recipients

The AAG is pleased to announce the recipients of the three 2021 AAG Book Awards: the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize, the AAG Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography, and the AAG Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work in Geography. The AAG Book Awards mark distinguished and outstanding works published by geography authors during the previous year, 2021. The awardees will be formally recognized at a future event when it is safe to do so. 

The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize

This award encourages and rewards American geographers who write books about the United States which convey the insights of professional geography in language that is both interesting and attractive to lay readers. 

Profiting from the Peak book coverJohn Harner, Profiting from the Peak: Landscape and Liberty in Colorado Springs

(University Press of Colorado, 2021) 

John Harner’s Profiting from the Peak: Landscape and Liberty in Colorado Springs triumphs as an accessibly written, wonderfully illustrated historical geography of a distinctive American place. Dedicated to Peirce Lewis, the book explores how Colorado Springs profited from its singular physical setting as well as its highly distinctive cultural evolution. Laced with dozens of grayscale and color maps and photographs, Harner brings to life a landscape shaped by various forces which are engagingly summarized in nine thematic chapters. 

Harner describes the shaping power of Grass, Water, Air, Metal, Rock, Fun, War, Liberty, and God as he crafts his historical narrative, taking us from Native hunters on the short-grass plains to twenty-first century evangelists who envision the place as a Front-Range crucible of conservative politics. Harner concludes this lovingly crafted and beautifully designed book by arguing that the Springs’ special sense of place derives from its physical setting, its vibrant downtown, and from the unique cultural values of its population. 

The AAG is pleased to recognize John Harner with the 2021 John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize.


The AAG Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography

This award is given for a book written or co-authored by a geographer that conveys most powerfully the nature and importance of geography to the non-academic world. 

Atlas of the Invisible book coverJames Cheshire and Oliver Uberti, Atlas of the Invisible

(W.W. Norton & Company, 2021) 

James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti’s Atlas of the Invisible is a stunning collection of maps and visualizations that tells the stories of our past, present, and future – turning massive datasets into inviting, intriguing, and sometimes disturbing presentations for both geographers and a broader audience. The volume displays the expertise of Cheshire in geographic data analysis and Uberti in cartography, addressing a wide range of topics from historical geography and climate change to geopolitics and social justice. Compelling essays explore myriad ideas and debates in the discipline: the history of mapping from Alexander von Humboldt to GIS, the power of mapping from redlining and gentrification to lead poisoning and air quality, the ethics and use of mobile phone data – even the role of data and mapping in a crisis as the approaching pandemic turned the abstract and invisible into the present and deadly. 

This is a book that geographers everywhere will recommend to non-geographers with pride. The authors hope that their work will move us from being simply spectators: “We hope that at least one of our stories will have inspired you to act.” Little doubt of that, and little surprise that this volume is scheduled for translation into nine languages. A far broader audience will become happily lost in what Cheshire and Uberti have found.


The AAG Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work in Geography

This award is given for a book written by a geographer that makes an unusually important contribution to advancing the science and art of geography.  

Dear Science and Other Stories book coverKatherine McKittrick, Dear Science and Other Stories

(Duke University Press, 2021) 

Dr. Katherine McKittrick’s Dear Science and Other Stories is the recipient of the 2021 American Association of Geographers’ Meridian Book Award, which recognizes a book published in the past year that makes an unusually important contribution to advancing the art and science of geography. 

Dear Science presents incredibly rich conceptual and methodological contributions for researchers in human geography and beyond. This innovative book traces how multiple forms of Black scholarship, art, and indeed, Black life, move through and beyond the straits of knowledge systems co-constituted with and emergent from white supremacy. It compels the reader to contend with their own spatial praxis through a concerted meditation on metaphor and memory and advances current debates in geography by introducing insights from a broad range of archives and interdisciplinary voices. 

McKittrick’s writing on the forms of productive and destructive erasure that confront Black geographies will become necessary and likely transformative reading for scholars within and beyond the discipline. 

The AAG is pleased to recognize Katherine McKittrick with its 2021 Meridian Book Award. 

The 2021 AAG Meridian Book Award Honorable Mention 

Palm Oil Diaspora book coverCase Watkins, Palm Oil Diaspora: Afro-Brazilian Landscapes and Economies on Bahia’s Dendê Coast (Cambridge University Press, 2021) is an exemplary piece that is certain to withstand the test of time. The longstanding influence of the author’s academic lineage extending from Sauer to Parsons, Denevan, Turner, Doolittle, and Sluyter is evident in the work. Moreover, through the integration of previously uncovered evidence, this book offers new perspectives and raises questions concerning the impact of racism and colonial ways of knowing on academic scholarship. 

The Radical Bookstore book coverKimberley Kinder, The Radical Bookstore: Counterspace for Social Movements (University of Minnesota Press, 2021) presents a new paradigm emerging in American geographic thought that is oriented toward social justice. Splendidly written, The Radical Bookstore not only offers a glimpse behind the scenes of a unique type of establishment that seeks to bring voice to marginalized peoples and perspectives, but it also challenges scholars to explore social movements through the lens of constructive activism. 

    Share

Video: AAG 2022 Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt

During her special presentation on March 1, 2022, AAG Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt calls to geographers to help build the resilient planet of tomorrow that will sustain our children and grandchildren. She talked about stopping climate change, promoting sustainable use of resources, reducing inequality, halting pandemics, promoting public safety in response to natural and man-made hazards and increasing healthy lifespan among other issues.

    Share