Video: AAG 2022 Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt

During her special presentation on March 1, 2022, AAG Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt calls to geographers to help build the resilient planet of tomorrow that will sustain our children and grandchildren. She talked about stopping climate change, promoting sustainable use of resources, reducing inequality, halting pandemics, promoting public safety in response to natural and man-made hazards and increasing healthy lifespan among other issues.

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AAG 2023 Denver Vintage Map Postcard

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Video: AAG 2022 Welcome from Gary Langham

During her special presentation on March 1, 2022, AAG Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt calls to geographers to help build the resilient planet of tomorrow that will sustain our children and grandchildren. She talked about stopping climate change, promoting sustainable use of resources, reducing inequality, halting pandemics, promoting public safety in response to natural and man-made hazards and increasing healthy lifespan among other issues.

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Video: AAG 2022 Welcome from Emily Yeh

During her special presentation on March 1, 2022, AAG Atlas Awardee Marcia McNutt calls to geographers to help build the resilient planet of tomorrow that will sustain our children and grandchildren. She talked about stopping climate change, promoting sustainable use of resources, reducing inequality, halting pandemics, promoting public safety in response to natural and man-made hazards and increasing healthy lifespan among other issues.

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AAG 2022 Virtual Annual Meeting PDF Program

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AAG 2022 Goes All Virtual

aag 2021 virtual image-44AAG has been closely monitoring the latest information surrounding COVID-19, and considering its effect in relation to our annual meeting scheduled for February 25 – March 1, 2022. After conferring with AAG Council, leadership and staff, we have made the decision to convert AAG2022 to an entirely virtual event. We based our decision on the best information we have now, given the repeated variant outbreaks, transmission rates, and on-going safety and service disruptions that present insurmountable challenges to running a safe, successful in-person meeting. In addition, our registration patterns and the recent membership survey confirm that the majority of our members are not comfortable returning to large, in-person meetings at this time.  

Fortunately, a streamlined process is in place to help session and activity organizers bring their programming to the virtual environment. AAG staff will convert any in-person or hybrid sessions or abstracts to virtual sessions. If you are already presenting virtually or organizing a virtual session, nothing will change for your presentation.  

We are also prepared to seamlessly provide a refund for the difference in in-person and virtual registration rates to all in-person participants. No action is needed on your part.  

While we were looking forward to gathering in person, we are confident that the virtual experience will deliver robust content and networking opportunities. We want to thank you for being part of the AAG community. Your presence and support mean the world to us, and we look forward to engaging with you at AAG2022. 

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Graduate Students Honored During AAG Regional Division Annual Fall Meetings for Outstanding Work

The American Association of Geographers (AAG) announces the recipients of the 2016 Council Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper at a Regional Meeting. Graduate student AAG members from around the U.S. participated by submitting to their region’s paper competition and attending their regional division fall meeting. A student paper from seven out of nine AAG regions was chosen by a jury of AAG regional division leaders and the honors for this inaugural award were given at each of the division meetings.

The award is designed to encourage graduate student participation at AAG regional division meetings and support their attendance at major AAG annual meetings. Each awardee will receive $1,000 in funding for use towards the awardee’s registration and travel costs to the AAG annual meeting.

Jacob Watkins, recipient of the East Lakes (ELDAAG) division’s award, is a master’s student at Western Michigan University. The award was presented by AAG President Glen MacDonald and ELDAAG Regional Councillor Patrick Lawrence.

Paul Miller, recipient of the Southeast division’s award, is a Ph.D. student at the University of Georgia.

Melody Lynch, recipient of the  New England\St. Lawrence Valley division’s award, is a master’s student at McGill University.

Ashley Marie Fent, recipient of the Pacific Coast division’s award, is a Ph.D. student at the University of California – Los Angeles.

The Middle States and Mid-Atlantic regional divisions did not issue an award in this category this year.

Learn more about submitting a paper next year

Kathleen Epstein, recipient of the Great Plains/Rocky Mountains (GPRM) division’s award, is a master’s student at Montana State University. Her paper is titled, “The multiple meanings of ecosystem management: A historical analysis of modern environmental conflict in the Greater Yellowstone.” Pictured from left to right are AAG Executive Director Doug Richardson, Vice President of GPRM Brandon J. Vogt, awardee Kathleen Epstein and AAG Past President Sarah Bednarz.
Stephanie Mundis, recipient of the Southwest (SWAAG) divisions’ award, is a master’s student at New Mexico State University. Her paper is titled “Spatial distribution of mosquitoes that vector Zika, dengue, and West Nile Virus in New Mexico” and included co-authors: Michaela Buenemann, Kathryn A. Hanley and Nathan Lopez-Brody.
Jason LaBrosse, recipient of the West Lakes division’s award, is a master’s student at the University of Northeastern Illinois. His paper is titled, “The Relationship Between Concentrated Commodified Pets Populations and the Urban Environment of Chicago.”
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What will be Presented at the 2021 AAG Meeting?

Jeong Chang Seong, Sanghoon JI, Ana Stanescu, Yubin Lee, and Chul Sue Hwang

Building off of an analysis completed for the cancelled in-person portion of the 2020 AAG Annual Meeting, Seong et al. have provided an update on presentation topics in anticipation of the 2021 AAG Annual Meeting.

A total of 2,952 papers and posters (2,648 papers; 304 posters) are scheduled to be presented at the AAG virtual annual meeting in April this year (numbers as of March 1, 2021). To help meeting participants and fellow geographers to find out what will be presented at the meeting, we summarized the AAG 2021 presentation submissions using the keyword network analysis method.

Figure 1. Major keywords and their network clusters.

After collecting all keywords from the presentation submissions, raw keywords were cleaned with deletion, concatenation, standardization, normalization, lemmatization, and conversion techniques. A total of 20,550 keywords were split into single-word keywords. Only distinctive words were retrieved in each paper by deleting any duplicate words. A total of 4,145 distinctive keywords were identified from the 20,550 keywords. We used 30 as the keyword frequency threshold during network visualization. As a result, a keyword network diagram was constructed with 124 keywords as shown in Figure 1. In the figure, circle sizes reflect keyword frequencies, edge widths indicate co-occurrences between two keywords, and circle colors indicate cluster memberships.
Urban (311) was identified as the most frequent keyword at the 2021 AAG annual meeting, followed by COVID-19 (199), GIS (167), climate change (163), social (139), spatial (133), infrastructure (130), water (128), food (117), analysis (114), development (112) and health (111). Each number in parentheses indicates the frequency of the keyword. When the Louvain algorithm was applied for grouping keywords, ten (10) topical clusters were identified as shown in Table 1. Even if the Urban keyword appeared most frequently, the COVID-19 cluster had the largest number (779) of keywords as members. When the influence of each cluster was measured, the COVID-19 cluster was also most influential in the keyword network with the largest eigenvector centrality amount of 18.20%.

Cluster Name
Count of Members
Percent (%) Influence
Top Five (5) Keywords
COVID-19 779 18.20 covid19, GIS, spatial, analysis, health
Urban 560 16.39 urban, development, governance, city, planning
Land Cover 615 12.36 remote sensing, forest, change, land, machine learning
Climate Change 459 11.51 climate change, climate, resilience, risk, vulnerability
Political Ecology 403 10.78 infrastructure, water, environmental, justice, political ecology
Sustainability 319 10.64 food, agriculture, community, system, management
Critical Geography 335 7.64 social, education, place, feminist, race
Border 272 5.60 digital, migration, labor, usa, river
Mapping 158 2.59 tourism, map, cultural, national, history
Culture 144 2.24 human, post, more, than, animal
Others 101 2.05 method, population, qualitative, violence, culture

Table 1. Major clusters identified from the AAG 2021 presentation keywords.

About 7.5% of papers (i.e., 222 papers among 2952) included COVID-19 or pandemic in their keywords. A further detailed network analysis with the 222 papers identified seven (7) sub-clusters of COVID-19 research as shown in Table 2. Overall, five topics appear to stand out that are (1) spatial analysis of mobility, (2) health and sanitization accessibility, (3) community resilience and policies, (4) lockdown and activity spaces, and (5) online education.

Sub-cluster Name
Count of Members
Percent (%) Influence
Top Five (5) Keywords
Spatial Analysis 87 20.09 mobility, social, analysis, human, spatial
Community Resilience 66 15.30 food, local, system, resilience, agriculture
Public Health 61 11.24 health, public, neighborhood, adult, older
Activity Space 59 10.28 space, risk, livelihood, management, activity
Lockdown Impacts 61 9.01 GIS, lockdown, infrastructure, transportation, behavior
Sanitization Accessibility 41 8.80 access, vulnerability, water, sanitation, adaptation
Urban Policy 39 8.00 urban, policy, density, housing, rural
Online Education and Others 101 17.29 learning, online, education, teaching, city

Table 2. Sub-clusters of COVID-19 research.

The urban keyword was used in 311 papers (10.5% of total papers). Table 3 shows major sub-clusters of urban research. Like the 2020 case, no topic dominates in the urban research when examining the percent influence values that were measured with the eigenvector centrality. It, rather, shows that multiple sub-clusters are competitive each other.

Sub-cluster Name
Count of Members
Percent (%) Influence
Top Five (5) Keywords
Urban Development 99 11.74 development, agriculture, food, social, rural
Vulnerability 70 11.69 governance, resilience, system, climate change, COVID-19
Housing 89 11.40 housing, land, estate, financialization, political
Sustainability 103 11.21 change, sustainability, landscape, machine learning, management
Urban Planning 86 11.12 planning, GIS, human, community, critical
Green Space 69 10.45 infrastructure, green, space, environmental justice, gentrification
Public Access 77 9.44 city, water, public, right, access
Others 250 22.95 china, heat, spatial, urbanization, political ecology

Table 3. Sub-clusters of urban research.

The keyword network analysis suggests a couple of watching points in the 2021 AAG conference presentations. One is the emergence of COVID-19 research as a very influential topic. It may be of great interest to many geographers to see how fellow researchers tackle the global pandemic phenomenon. The other is the integration of GIS and spatial analysis into the COVID-19 cluster.

The 2021 AAG Conference is held virtually this year. Even if it is heartbreaking that we cannot meet fellow geographers face-to-face, the virtual conference will be an opportunity for us to overcome geographic mobility restrictions. We hope to see you all during the conference.

DOI: 10.14433/2017.0088

Acknowledgment: This research was supported by the MSIT (Ministry of Science, ICT), Republic of Korea, under the High-Potential Individuals Global Training Program (IITP-2020-0-01593) supervised by the IITP (Institute for Information & Communications Technology Planning & Evaluation).

About the Authors

Jeong Chang Seong, Ph. D., is a professor of geography at University of West Georgia (UWG), Carrollton, GA

Sanghoon JI is a graduate student at Kyung Hee University (KHU) who is currently performing a visiting research at UWG

Ana Stanescu, Ph. D., is an assistant professor of computer science at University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA

Yubin Lee is a graduate student at KHU, Seoul, South Korea

Chul Sue Hwang, Ph. D., is a professor of geography at KHU, Seoul, South Korea

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Social Media at #AAG2021

We’re getting closer to the 2021 AAG Annual Meeting! Whether you will be attending the meeting all week, for a few days, or catching up with recordings of presentations between other obligations, there are plenty of ways to get involved using social media. Social media is a great way for seasoned conference goers and newcomers alike to network, report on new research, engage in lively debate with those inside and outside of the discipline, and find out what’s going on during the largest geography conference in the world. Start planning your #AAG2021 social media strategy today with these helpful guidelines:

Twitter

One of the most frequently used social media sites for live events, Twitter is a great place to start scoping out the annual meeting. Twitter is used by geographers to discuss research ideas, share recent publications, or connect with others. As the main social media channel, the AAG annual meeting has had active Twitter users since at least 2011 in Seattle. This year the official conference hashtag will be #AAG2021. Start using and following #AAG2021; posts are already being compiled in anticipation of the meeting. If you are new to Twitter, try these tips to benefit most from the network:

  • Follow @theAAG on Twitter. The official AAG Twitter account will be active throughout the meeting with important announcements, live tweets of events, and fun ways to virtually interact with other conference attendees.
  • Use #AAG2021 on all your meeting related communications. Sometimes it is difficult to fit your thoughts into the 280 character count, but try to include the hashtag #AAG2021 in each of your tweets. This will ensure that your tweets are being seen by others who are attending the conference or following along. If you are new to hashtags, a hashtag is a way to organize a specific topic into one feed. Click on the hashtag to see the conversations happening related to that topic.
  • Whenever possible, try to include Twitter handles. If you are tweeting about a paper, panel, or poster, be sure to attribute the research to the right person by using their Twitter handle (@[name]). Presenters and panelists should consider including their handles on an opening slide or in a poster corner. Conversely, if you do not want your research to be tweeted, please state that information upfront so the audience is aware of your desires.
  • Follow the hashtag and join the conversation! The great thing about Twitter conversations is that they can be both live or asynchronous, helpful for those communicating between time zones.

Facebook

Do you prefer Facebook over Twitter as your social media site of choice? While there will be less live coverage of specific sessions, Facebook is a great way to share videos and news about the annual meeting with your friends, family, and colleagues.

  • Make sure you like the AAG Facebook page (www.facebook.com/geographers) and set the page so that you see it first in your News Feed by clicking on the “Following” dropdown menu on the AAG Facebook page itself. This will ensure that you receive the latest meeting related announcements as soon as you open the Facebook app or website.
  • Check on the page each morning for reminders of the day’s schedule of events.

Instagram

Instagram is a fun place to share your photos of your daily life as a geographer and where in the world you are participating from for the AAG Annual Meeting.

  • Follow @theAAG on Instagram for visual representations of programs currently underway at the AAG.
  • Share your photos of your personal experience of the annual meeting with other attendees using the conference hashtag #AAG2021.

Linked in

The AAG has recently expanded its presence on the professional networking site, Linked in. New features, such as the ability to write and publish short blog-style posts, has recently set Linked in apart from other social networks. With the ability to share content using hashtags, Linked in is a great network to share research, ask for feedback, and hear from industry thought leaders.

  • Are you following the AAG’s page on Linked in? Be sure to hit the follow button to ensure that anything posted by the AAG shows up in your feed.
  • Use #AAG2021 on Linked in as you would with Instagram or Twitter. Hashtags on Linked in work similarly to those on Instagram or Twitter, giving users a chance to follow a long with conversations about a particular topic, in this case, the 2021 AAG Annual Meeting.
  • Share upcoming professional development events or other items of interest to your Linked in feed using relevant hashtags. By adding hashtags to your posts, more people are likely to see your content.

General Communications

Because the AAG social media channels will be busy during the annual meeting, AAG staff may not be able to provide a timely reply through these mediums. The AAG Annual Meeting Website is a good place to start for conference information with regards to technology related questions, session times, and abstracts. If you have questions or concerns and need to contact a staff member, the best option is to email meeting[at]aag[dot[org].

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What will be Presented at the 2020 AAG Meeting?

Jeong Chang Seong, Chul Sue Hwang, Ana Stanescue, Yubin Lee, and Youngho Lee

A total of 4,893 papers and posters are scheduled to be presented at the Denver AAG Annual Meeting in April this year (numbers as of February 2, 2020). In order to help meeting participants and fellow geographers to sketch out what is going to be presented at the meeting, we summarized the AAG 2020 presentation submissions using keywords network analysis methods.

We collected all keywords from the presentation submissions. They were preprocessed with deletion, concatenation, standardization, normalization, and conversion techniques. A total of 21,954 keywords were split into single-word keywords. Any duplicate words in each record were also deleted. A total of 6,521 unique keywords were identified. We used 40 as the keyword frequency threshold for network visualization. As a result, a keywords network diagram was constructed with 129 keywords as shown in Figure 1. In the figure, circle sizes reflect keyword frequencies, edge widths indicate co-occurrences between two keywords, and circle colors indicate cluster memberships.

Figure 1. A keywords network constructed with the 2020 AAG presentation submissions

Urban (532) was identified as the most frequent keyword at the 2020 AAG Annual Meeting, followed by GIS (322), Spatial (276), Climate Change (234), Development (218), Water (215), Health (191), Climate (168), Remote Sensing (164), Social (158), and Food (158). Each number in parentheses indicates the frequency of the keyword.

When a keywords network clustering algorithm was applied, keywords were grouped into 12 topical clusters as shown in Table 1. The Urban cluster had the largest number (1522) of keywords as members. When the influence of each cluster was measured with the eigenvector centrality, the Urban cluster was also most influential by taking 28.12% of all possible connections among keywords. When only the Urban papers were analyzed, eleven Urban sub-clusters were identified, and their percent influences and member keyword counts are shown in Table 2.  No particular topic stands out in the Urban research. Rather, several topics are very competitive.

Table 1. Clusters of AAG 2020 Presentations
Table 2. Sub-clusters of Urban Research

Some other interesting watch points are also found in the AAG 2020 presentation submissions. Firstly, this year’s 4,893 presentations are significantly less than last year’s 6,026 presentations. Secondly, the Spatial Data Science theme is independent of the GIS theme. It appears to be a much more influential cluster than GIS. Thirdly, the Urban cluster doesn’t seem to be a proprietary estate for traditional urban geographers. It embraces various expertise like GIS, data science and modeling, land use and landcover, water, ecology, and environmental health. Indeed, Urban is rather a solid entity calling diverse geographers. Finally, it will be interesting to see what will happen to the HealthWaterEducationGeopolitics, and Ontology clusters. Will they keep tenures at the AAG 2021 Meeting at Seattle?

Acknowledgment: This research was supported by the MSIT (Ministry of Science, ICT), Republic of Korea, under the High-Potential Individuals Global Training Program (IITP-2019-0-01603) supervised by the IITP (Institute for Information & Communications Technology Planning & Evaluation). We also thank AAG for supporting data for this research, and thank Dr. Coline Dony, AAG Senior Geography Researcher, for encouraging us to submit this article to the AAG Newsletter. 

DOI: 10.14433/2017.0068

About the Authors
Jeong Chang Seong, Ph. D., is a professor of geography at University of West Georgia (UWG), Carrollton, GA
Chul Sue Hwang, Ph. D., is a professor of geography at Kyung Hee University (KHU), Seoul, South Korea
Ana Stanescu, Ph. D., is an assistant professor of computer science at University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
Yubin Lee is a graduate student at KHU who is currently performing a visiting research at UWG
Youngho Lee is a graduate student at KHU who is currently performing a visiting research at UWG

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